WORLD AIDS DAY 2012

JOIN US FOR A TWITTERCHAT!

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TAKING ROOT PREMIERES NEW STORIES FOR WORLD AIDS DAY 2012

In honor of World AIDS Day, the Banyan Tree Project will share new digital stories online in our first ever TwitterChat this December. The stories are part of Taking Root, a community-driven and community-owned digital storytelling initiative highlighting the experiences of A&PIs living with or affected by HIV.

Ten storytellers created their own videos this past August in a Bay Area workshop facilitated by A&PI Wellness Center and the Center for Digital Storytelling. The stories, like the workshop itself, explore painful experiences with honesty, compassion, and hope.

"When I told my story, a great weight lifted from my shoulders," said one anonymous participant. "I never knew how heavy my burden was until I let it go."

In "Child of God," a Fijian man living with HIV struggles to reconcile himself with his family and faith. In "YOLO," a young Asian American man rejects the fatalism of barebacking, embracing the connections that make safer-sex worthwhile.

This World AIDS Day, we look forward to the "end of HIV" as we honor the friends and family we have lost in the epidemic. As we dare to hope, we must remember that HIV stigma—the shame and fear that silences us, isolates us—is still the greatest barrier to HIV testing and treatment for the A&PI community. Join us on Twitter to witness powerful stories that refuse to remain untold.

We're all affected by HIV. Start the conversation #withoutshame.

Taking Root TwitterChat Schedule:
December 11, 2012
First Session: 10AM Pacific Time/1PM Eastern Time
Second Session: 5PM Pacific Time/2PM Hawaiian Time/11AM (Dec 12) Chamorro Time

To join, follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/BTPMay19 or @BTPMay19

Follow the conversation using the hashtag #withoutshame

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Questions? Contact David Stupplebeen, Media & Communications Coordinator, at das@apiwellness.org.


World AIDS Day 2010

James Kyson-Lee on World AIDS Day

James Kyson-Lee, one of the stars from NBC's "Heroes" sat down with the Banyan Tree Project for World AIDS Day. James wants the Asian & Pacific Islander community, especially A&PI youth, to learn the facts about HIV. We are all at risk, but we can protect ourselves with knowledge and action. Talk about HIV—for you, for me, for everyone!

Blogging for World AIDS Day

The Banyan Tree Project was recently asked by theBody.com to participate in a series of blog posts for World AIDS Day. TheBody.com is a complete HIV/AIDS resource, using the web to lower barriers between patients and clinicians demystify HIV/AIDS and its treatment, improve the quality of life for all people living with HIV/AIDS, and foster community through human connection.

This special series for World AIDS Day captures the diversity of the AIDS community. Through the rest of the month and beginning of December, postings from clients, staff and community advocates will be appearing on The Body's special World AIDS Day page. Read posts from Will, Sonia, and Adam, or explore all the posts written for World AIDS Day.

News and Events

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Center for Digital Storytelling

CDC Disclaimer: This site contains HIV prevention messages that may not be appropriate for all audiences. If you are not seeking such information or may be offended by such materials, please exit this website.

The Banyan Tree Project is a program of Asian & Pacific Islander Wellness Center

Our partners are nonprofit and community-based organizations dedicated to providing HIV referrals, education, outreach, advocacy, prevention and care services to A&PI communities.

This web site was supported by Cooperative Agreement Number 1U65PS002095-01 from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Taking Root Digital Storytelling Initiative is also supported by the Office of Minority Health Resource Center. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Office of Minority Health Resource Center.